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   Dr. Craig Jessop, Dean of the Caine College of the Arts, is a very pleasant man. However, his title, as well as his distinguished role as Music Director of the world famous Mormon Tabernacle Choir, tends to keep intimidated students at a distance. To tear down those unapproachable walls, the Dogs with the Dean event was developed and I was charged with designing materials to promote it as a fun and comfortable atmosphere for students, faculty, staff and the dean to all rub shoulders, chum it up, and have a good time as Aggies.
   
  
 
  
    
  
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   Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog was difficult to promote, not because of the show itself, but because so many students loved the posters and decided to pull them off the walls and take them home. (Note to self: Next time, make the poster less cool.)
   
  
 
  
    
  
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   I enjoyed playing off of the typography in this poster. The guitar motif is simple, but interesting. I overlaid guitar anatomy in both the negative and positive spaces of USU. I also outlined the USU with two unaligned strokes to imitate vibrating strings. The shadows below the letters also replicate stage lighting. Lastly, I threw in a Fender-style font below the title.
   
  
 
  
    
  
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   This is perhaps the most symbolic poster I have made. Mrs. Hill is a play written by a student at USU. It is about a woman whose husband, a pastor, contracted AIDS. Strapped for cash and trying to support her husband who needs expensive medical treatment, Mrs. Hill faces a difficult decision. Does she watch her husband die? Or does she resort to sinful prostitution in order to pay for his life-saving treatments? Obviously a plot laced with irony and universal themes, Mrs. Hill was a challenging play for which to design a poster. I decided to take the simplistic route, which turned out to be very powerful. The female icon, which makes the theme relatable to any woman, is literally tearing in half, all the way down to her sexual organs. The decision may seem black and white to some, but Mrs. Hill has to weigh the outcomes of each side and make a choice.
   
  
 
  
    
  
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   Ok, maybe this is the most “symbolic” poster I have made. (Ha. Get it?) I chose a beautiful, eye catching photo and added a little rhythm to the typography to help it match the percussion theme. I wanted the photo to garner the most hierarchy, because it speaks for itself, next the title, date, location, and ticketing information. The hierarchy is what made this poster successful.
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